Do Geese Eat Bugs? (Is It Healthy?)

The answer to this question is yes. If you’ve ever seen a flock of geese eating on a lawn, you can be certain that they’re eating bugs as well as the grass. In fact, geese will eat just about anything that’s edible and they have been known to eat some pretty strange things.

They, together with ducks are considered a great natural pest control, eating thousands of ants and other insects on farms and in grasslands.

Is Eating Bugs Good For Geese?

Eating bugs is good for geese because even if they don’t need it, it provides them with a complete nutritional profile. Geese are omnivores and they need to eat both plants and animals.

Some benefits of eating Bugs and insects are that they are a complete source of nutrition for the body.

It is estimated that only about 20% of the total protein in a meal for geese comes from plants. Most of the rest is in the form of insects, some insects are even used as a supplement to enhance the nutritional value in their diet.

Insects vary from one species to another, but larval and pupal stages contain comprehensive amounts of protein, fat, minerals and vitamins that can provide a good balance for an omnivorous species like the Canada goose. The amount of protein found in some fly larvae can be as high as 24%.

Insects also have a much higher fat content when compared to animal products. For example, groundhoppers have a fat content of about 95%, which is nearly three times that of meat. They are still high in protein percentage but contain less fat.

Insects can be a source of food for geese, chickens and other poultry as well as being used as a supplement for the diet. A mixed diet can help maintain the needed nutritional value that is crucial for the geese to live longer and perform at their best.

A mixture of insects, plants and animal products can help provide a balanced diet.

What Kind Of Bugs Do Geese Eat?

Geese eat any type of bug they come across while they’re eating their grasses. They’ll eat beetles, flies, moths, spiders, crickets, grasshoppers, and even ticks.

They eat smaller insects first, then move on to larger preys. The grasshoppers and crickets are what they like because they are easy to swallow. They will also go after the winged insects like bees, wasps, and butterflies.

Do Geese Eat Ants?

Yes, geese will eat ants, which are quite delicious. Geese like to eat ants because they have a high protein level and a good fat content. Ants are very nutritious for geese and will keep them healthy.

Do Geese Eat Grasshoppers?

Grasshoppers are found in fields and marshes, where geese are commonly seen. Geese love eating grasshoppers, which taste delicious and provide them with a good source of protein.

Yes, geese will eat grasshoppers like all other insects they come across while they’re grazing on their grasses.

Do Geese Eat Butterflies?

Geese will eat many different kinds of bugs, including butterflies.

They’re especially fond of eating dragonflies. If you’ve ever seen a goose go after a bug, you’ll know that they don’t let anything get in their way.

Some people think geese are such good bugs eaters because they can stay on the ground and scoop up insects like ants and caterpillars.

Do Geese Eat Flies?

They will for sure eat flies, and are quite happy to do so.

They will eat all kinds of bugs, including flies. If you’ve ever seen a goose go after a fly, you’ll know that they don’t let anything get in their way.

Do Geese Eat Roaches?

Cockroaches get eaten daily by geese, since they’re so easy to catch.

Roaches are quite tasty for geese and help them get the protein they need.

Conclusion

Geese eat a wide variety of bugs, they make up a good part of their diet if they are free to roam and eat what they want.

Some bugs that geese eat are ants, flies, and caterpillars.

So, if you have a bug problem in your hands, a great natural remedy is to unleash a flock of geese after them to make this problem disappear!

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